LATEST NEWS FROM PLC

Partnering for Protection in Francestown

October 2016 - The Piscataquog Land Conservancy has a long history of protecting land in Francestown, which is located in the western reaches of the Pistcatquog River watershed.  PLC completed its first conservation project in the town in 1986, and today owns or holds easements on fourteen properties that comprise almost 900 acres of land.  About half of all this acreage has been protected by PLC in partnership with the Francestown Land Trust (FLT), an all-volunteer land trust focused solely on protecting land in the town.  Of the seven projects we have worked on together to date, two were conservation easements on lands acquired and now owned by FLT, the other five are executory (or “back up”) interests in easements held by FLT.  The groups are currently working on two new land conservation projects that continue our long-standing and fruitful partnership. Read the complete story in the PLC Fall Newsletter.

The Year in Review

By Paul Doscher, Board of Trustees Chair, and Chris Wells, President/Executive Director

October 2016 - The Piscataquog Land Conservancy completed its 2015-16 fiscal year (FY16) on June 30, 2016. We are happy to report it proved to be another very productive and successful one for PLC. Here are some highlights:

  • We protected more than 450 acres of land.
  • We expanded our service area.
  • We took good care of our properties.
  • We expanded our outdoor events.
  • We began land trust accreditation.
  • We balanced our budget.

PLC is a small, lean and local organization that gets a lot done. Our professional staff is big enough to do our conservation and stewardship work to the highest national standards. Yet we are still small enough to depend on the talents and dedication of volunteers to achieve our mission, and on the loyalty and generosity of our local members to keep all the good work going. In short, the Piscataquog Land Conservancy is all of us. On behalf of the board and staff of PLC, THANK YOU. Read the full report in the PLC Fall Newsletter.

How to Help a Trout in a Drought
By John Magee

South Branch of the Piscataquog August 2016 -by TJ 250x232.jpgOctober 2016 - Droughts happen. When they do, most of the talk is about how they impact the water supply for humans. But droughts also affect fish. In dry years and wet ones alike, the story of trout here in New Hampshire and elsewhere always comes back to trees. A landmark scientific paper from 2005 rightly proclaimed that "the riparian zone is fish habitat.” Riparian areas are the lands that are next to a waterbody, not in the water. What? Fish can live out of the water...on land? No, of course not, but fish habitat is shaped by riparian vegetation and a tremendous amount of the food fish depend on comes directly and indirectly from there. Or as April Pulley Sayre says in her children's book about this subject, "Trout are Made of Trees." Read more in our PLC Fall Newsletter.

PUBLIC NOTICE

LTA accreditation logo 250x94.jpg

COMMENT PERIOD OPEN for PLC's Application
for Land Trust Accreditation

On September 23rd, the Piscataquog Land Conservancy submitted its full application for national land trust accreditation, a program that provides independent verification that land conservation organizations are meeting national quality standards.  The process is conducted by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission (LTAC), an independent program of the Land Trust Alliance, which conducts an extensive review of each applicant’s policies and programs.  A public comment period on PLC’s application is currently open.

The LTAC invites public input and accepts signed, written comments on pending applications. Comments must relate to how Piscataquog Land Conservancycomplies with national quality standards.  These standards address the ethical and technical operation of a land trust. See the full list of standards here

To learn more about the accreditation program and to submit a comment, visit www.landtrustaccreditation.org, or email your comment to info@landtrustaccreditation.org. Comments may also be faxed or mailed to the Land Trust Accreditation Commission, Attn: Public Comments: (fax) 518-587-3183; (mail) 112 Spring Street, Suite 204, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866.  Comments onPiscataquog Land Conservancy’s application will be most useful by November 11th, 2016.

Welcome! 
In 1969, a group of neighbors created the Piscataquog Watershed Association (PWA) to protect critical land along the Piscataquog River. Now the Piscataquog Land Conservancy (PLC), that legacy has grown to include more than 6,200 acres on 103 conservation tracts. 
Join us today and create your own conservation legacy!

Black Brook - original (2) - 239x307.jpgBlack Brook Conservation Project
Completed in Goffstown

June 22, 2016 The Piscataquog Land Conservancy and Town of Goffstown have completed the protection of 101 acres of undeveloped land in the northeast corner of town that includes half a mile of frontage on Black Brook, extensive wetlands and beaver ponds, and prime wildlife habitat.  Located between Black Brook and Montelona Roads, the land abuts PLC's 126-exisitng Blackbriar Woods Preserve, and will be managed by PLC subject to a conservation easement held by the town.  The land will be open to the public for recreation, including hunting and fishing.  Read the press release:  PLC Black Brook Completed PR 6-22-16.pdf

Weare for WEB.jpgPLC Expands Conservation Area in Weare

April 2016 - The Piscataquog Land Conservancy completed the expansion of the Grant Family Farm Conservation Area in Weare.  A 52- acre parcel owned by the family was added to an existing 20-acre conservation easement completed with PLC in 2010.  When combined with PLC’s abutting 114-acre Walker conservation easement, the newly-expanded conservation property protects nearly all of Mt. Dearborn.  Read the full story in the PLC Summer Newsletter.

Read the PLC Fall Newsletter

The Fall 2016 issue of the Piscataquog News is hot off the presses...read it HERE in beautiful full color!

Join Our Mailing List

Keep up with what's going on at PLC by signing up for our mailing list.  You can choose to receive monthly email updates on upcoming PLC outdoor events, our quarterly print newsletter in the mail, or both!  

Enhanced Tax Incentive for Easement Donations

April 2016 - The vast majority of the land and conservation easements held by the Piscataquog Land Conservancy have come to us through donations by private individuals and families.  While the primary motivation for anyone giving land or an easement to PLC is to protect a place they love in perpetuity, there can also be significant federal income tax benefits.  The value of land or a conservation easement donated to a non-profit land trust like PLC is treated as a charitable contribution by the IRS, and is deductible from taxable income.  Thanks to concerted lobbying by the national Land Trust Alliance, the tax deduction for donated conservation easements has become more generous in recent years.  Read the full story in the PLC Spring 2016 Newsletter.   

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Support Our Mission

The Piscataquog Land Conservacy is a charitable organization registered with the State of New Hampshire. Taxpayer ID number 23-7085677